• They have a lot more to teach us.

    We've learned a lot with your help. But there's still so much we need to know to protect our wild dolphin neighbors.

    Give to dolphin research at the Cape Lookout Studies Program.

  • Sea Turtel sick and injured from fishing line

    You can stop this.

    Protecting marine wildlife is within your reach.

    When you give to put monofilament recycling bins within reach of conscientious boaters and anglers.

  • Harbor seal in need

    Save lives, reduce suffering, learn more.

    It's a win, win, win – when you support our Marine Mammal Stranding Network.

    Please give generously to the Cape Lookout Studies Program.

  • Cetacean Studies

    Inspire curiosity.

    What does it take to get students interested in science and conservation? Your help.

    Please give generously to support Cetacean Studies and the Bonehenge rearticulation project.

Posts Tagged ‘sea turtle’

Green Sea Turtle Rescue

Written by Tursiops. Posted in Uncategorized

Rescue of juvenile green sea turtle

April 11, 2003

As we arrived at the old Coast Guard docks at Cape Lookout for our annual clean-up trip, Keith observed a turtle laying on it’s back near the water. Upon examination Keith discovered the green sea turtle was still alive, but in bad shape. The turtle’s carapace was covered with big barnacles and there were barnacles on the soft tissue of the neck. Keith and volunteer Carl Spangler carried the turtle to Harker’s Island by boat where he was met by Wendy Cluse, Assistant Sea Turtle Biologist for the NC Wildlife Resources Commission. Wendy drove the turtle the remainder of the way to the The Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center on Topsail Island. At the hospital the turtle was given the name “Stormy”. Last report was that the green sea turtle was now eating. We’re pulling for you “Stormy”.

Update: “Stormy” recovered and was released on 9/24/03.

plastron view, green sea turtle
Plastron View

Carapace covered in big barnicles, green sea turtle
Carapace covered in big barnacles

Transfering green sea turtle to Wendy
Transferring turtle to Wendy

Leatherback Sea Turtle Rescue

Written by Tursiops. Posted in Uncategorized

Leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea)
Turtle Rescue

by Martha Crooker, April 20, 2002

On Saturday, April 20, the Cape Lookout Photographic Expedition sponsored by the North Carolina Maritime Museum, was interrupted by a rare and unfortunate event.Shortly before 5pm, Keith Rittmaster, Natural Science Curator and Field Studies Program Director, and museum volunteer Hugh Wilde, were preparing to make a boat run to Harker’s Island to pick up developed film, when Wilde spotted something splashing off the docks in Cape Lookout Bight.

On close investigation, Keith and Hugh discovered that an endangered leatherback sea turtle had become entrapped in a sink gill net. The struggling turtle was unable to surface for air. Although sea turtles are often submerged for long periods of time, this turtle appeared to be under a great deal of stress.

The two men were able to free the turtle just enough to allow it to surface and to breath. Keith assessed the situation and knew they needed more help if the rescue attempt would be successful.

A different boat was obtained, several people from the photographic expedition were summoned to assist, other visitors at the cape stood by to help, and still others began to document the rescue attempt with cameras. From the boat, Keith and crew were able to cut the net and guide the entangled turtle to shore. Indeed, the turtle headed to shore on his own accord, pulling the boat to shallower water.

Leatherback sea turtles are listed on the Federal Endangered Species List, and thus protected by the Endangered Species Act. Leatherbacks are the largest species of sea turtles, and are most often found in tropical waters. In the spring, Keith often sees leatherbacks first, before he sees loggerhead turtles, the species he most frequently encounters.

For the observers on shore, it appeared that every move counted in freeing the turtle from the net. Keith spoke to the crowd as he worked, sharing facts about the leatherback species. He addressed issues that relate to conflicts between commercial fishing and bycatch. He expressed empathy for the fisherman whose net he damaged while freeing the turtle. One of the volunteers assisting offered to ‘pass the hat’ to collect money to repair the net. Keith acknowledged this generous offer and said he would attempt to contact the owner.

Keith took the opportunity to take measurements of the turtle while museum volunteer Allen Brooks recorded the data. This particular turtle, a male, was nearly six feet long and it’s age estimated to be between ten and twenty years old

Rittmaster, who holds a permit to tag sea turtles, inserted an imbedded, lifelong tag on the turtle, as well as two external tags. These tags are crucial for research and future marine conservation measures.

The turtle appeared unharmed by the ordeal in the gill net, and after measurements were taken and information recorded, the turtle was guided back to open water. Everyone stepped aside to watch the turtle plod from the shore, to deeper water, then disappear below the surface.

Relief and joy spread among the rescuers, the photographers, and the bystanders. After having taken part in such a successful event in marine conservation, we all knew we had witnessed a rare and spectacular rescue. It was obvious to all who watched the rescue that Keith responded in the only appropriate manner. Any passerby would have attempted to free the turtle. Had not Keith freed the turtle, the owner of the net would have found a carcass of a rare sea turtle to deal with, and in the extracting process, would likely have damaged the net. One less sea turtle, why does that matter?

Leatherback sea turtles feed on jellyfish. Their predators are killer whales and sharks (and man). Protecting endangered sea turtles does matter because they are vital to the marine food web and healthy ecosystems. This rare leatherback sea turtle was worthy of being set free.

Martha Crooker
Author of the article,
Martha Crooker

Rescue boat

Rescue boat skippered by John Atkins approaches leatherback sea turtle struggling in net.

Trapped in a net

Netted leatherback sea turtle struggling to surface for air by rescue boat.

Removing net

Leatherback sea turtle ashore with net still attached

Taking measurements

Using large calipers to measure straight carapace length (137cm) and width (75cm). Note remora that stayed attached throughout rescue.

Close-up of turtle’s head

Close-up of turtle’s head. The pink spots on top can be used in Photo-ID. CLSP has started a leatherback catalog.

Heading Home

Rescued leatherback sea turtle returns to sea – YEAH!!

Loggerhead Turtle Rescue

Written by Tursiops. Posted in Uncategorized

Loggerhead Turtle Rescue

     by Allen Brooks, July 12,2001

One of the activities we try to involve participants in is Sea Turtle Conservation so during turtle nesting season we regularly patrol the beach early in the morning looking for signs of turtle nesting activity.

Loggerhead buried at pointThis past July 12 around 7 am we found a 350 lb female Loggerhead half buried in the sand below the high tide line at the very tip of the point. We thought she was dead until we looked at her eye and she looked back.

Loggerhead had injured peak.The turtle was very weak, skinny and had a damaged peak  The Carapace has carpet of reddish algae and barnacles.

Loggerhead being transported to SpyhopKeith made some calls and it was decided that we would transport the turtle to the Sea Turtle Hospital in Topsail Beach, NC. Along with some kids on an outing with the Coastal Federation we transported the turtle to the old Coast Guard dock.

Loggerhead being carried to SpyhopThe turtle was loaded onto Spyhop and covered with wet towels for the ride to Harker’s Island. She was so big it took 5 guys to carry her to the boat.

Loggerhead being loaded onto SpyhopAt Harker’s Island we were met by Susana Clusella, the assistant sea turtle coordinator for North Carolina, who drove her the remainder of the way to the The Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Hospital. Visit The Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Hospital’s web site:

UPDATE
This lucky turtle completely recovered thanks to the efforts of staff and volunteers at The Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Hospital and was released in the Spring of 2002 at Topsail Island. The hospital staff had named her “Cape” and had become quite attached after feeding, bathing, and caring for her for almost a year. When Cape got near the ocean there was no stopping her, she was going home. Good Luck Cape!