• They have a lot more to teach us.

    We've learned a lot with your help. But there's still so much we need to know to protect our wild dolphin neighbors.

    Give to dolphin research at the Cape Lookout Studies Program.

  • Sea Turtel sick and injured from fishing line

    You can stop this.

    Protecting marine wildlife is within your reach.

    When you give to put monofilament recycling bins within reach of conscientious boaters and anglers.

  • Harbor seal in need

    Save lives, reduce suffering, learn more.

    It's a win, win, win – when you support our Marine Mammal Stranding Network.

    Please give generously to the Cape Lookout Studies Program.

  • Cetacean Studies

    Inspire curiosity.

    What does it take to get students interested in science and conservation? Your help.

    Please give generously to support Cetacean Studies and the Bonehenge rearticulation project.

NC Monofilament Recovery & Recycling Program

When marine animals die from becoming entangled in discarded fishing line, we all lose. But we can greatly reduce the number of useless deaths with your participation on the NC Monofilament Recovery and Recycling Program. It’s easy, it’s convenient, and it’s the right thing to do.

monofilament recycling

Portable monofilament recycling bin, by Keith Rittmaster

Monofilament recyclingLogo for the Monofilament Recovery and Recycling Program

If you’ve ever witnessed an animal that’s been entangled in improperly discarded fishing line, you’ll understand why the monofilament recycling program is so important. Don’t leave your old fishing line on the beach, unsecured on the boat, or in the ocean. And when it’s time to get rid of it, look for one of the convenient recycling bins. Fishing line thrown in the trash works its way to the top of the landfill and often finds its way back into the environment. With your help, we can greatly reduce the number of useless deaths of some of our most important marine species.

Look for the convenient recycling bins

Monofilament Recycling and Recovery Program volunteers have placed over 60 recycling bins across the North Carolina coast and they’re adding more all the time. You’ll find them at piers, docks, boat ramps, marinas and the best retailers on the coast. So far, volunteers have collected over 700 miles of discarded fishing line. Recycle your fishing line and help ensure that the most amazing coastal environment in America, stays that way. Looking for your nearest bin?

Check out our map of Fishing Line Recycling Bin locations at the bottom of this page.

 

Anthropocene NCARI 011 capt, monofilament recycling

NC Monofilament Recovery & Recycling Program brochure (pdf)

Getting Started (pdf)

Monofilament bin locations (pdf)

 

Preservation and Display of the skull of an entangled bottlenose dolphin:

SEAMAMMS-UNF-2013-KR5, monofilament recycling

Why it's important: Yaholo's Story

  • Yand and her healthy calf, October 2004

  • Yang is identified by her dorsal fin

  • Yang's dolphin calf is struggling

  • Fishing line cutting into the young dolphin

  • This dolphin calf died due to fishing line entanglement

  • Fishing line removed from inside and out of the dolphin calf

  • 1: October 2004 – Yang and her healthy calf, Yaholo, swimming in the ocean near Beaufort inlet. Photo: Keith Rittmaster. For the complete story, click here.
  • 2: October 2004 – Yang is identified by her dorsal fin. We've known her for a decade! Photo: Keith Rittmaster. For the complete story, click here.
  • 3: January 2005 – Yang and Yaholo return, but the calf is entangled in fishing line and isn't swimming well. Photo: Keith Rittmaster. For the complete story, click here.
  • 4: January 2005 – The fishing line is forcing his back to bow, and is cutting deep into his mouth, tail, back and sides – slowly killing the young calf. Photo: Keith Rittmaster. For the complete story, click here.
  • 5: January 2005 – Despite the best efforts of researchers and volunteers, the dolphin calf dies. For the complete story, click here.
  • Please recycle your fishing line and support the monofilament recycling program. Their lives depend on you. Photo: NOAA/NMFS, Beaufort Labs. For the complete story, click here.

Fishing Line Recycling Bins