• They have a lot more to teach us.

    We've learned a lot with your help. But there's still so much we need to know to protect our wild dolphin neighbors.

    Give to dolphin research at the Cape Lookout Studies Program.

  • Sea Turtel sick and injured from fishing line

    You can stop this.

    Protecting marine wildlife is within your reach.

    When you give to put monofilament recycling bins within reach of conscientious boaters and anglers.

  • Harbor seal in need

    Save lives, reduce suffering, learn more.

    It's a win, win, win – when you support our Marine Mammal Stranding Network.

    Please give generously to the Cape Lookout Studies Program.

  • Cetacean Studies

    Inspire curiosity.

    What does it take to get students interested in science and conservation? Your help.

    Please give generously to support Cetacean Studies and the Bonehenge rearticulation project.

Blog Migration

Written by Tursiops. Posted in Website Management

We’ve added the final blog entry to the Spyhop Log at Blogspot. Here it is (below). Thanks to BlogSpot and to all the wonderful contributors who’ve kept the Spyhop Log up and running over all these years. If you’ve been a contributor in the past, and would like to be again, contact us and we’ll set you up with access to the new blog!

The final blogspot post is shown here:

Spyhop Log moving from Blogspot to CapeLookoutStudies.org

Like the marine mammals we love so much, it’s time for the Spyhop Log to migrate.

Blog migration, stage 2

Written by Tursiops. Posted in Website Management

The blog was imported over from BlogSpot this morning. Now, the images are being imported as well. Most came over without a fight, but there’s a few that have to be moved over one-at-a-time.

Next we’ll place a post on the BlogSpot site to let people know this is the new spot for the blog. [ DONE! ] If you’re looking for an old post, they should still be posted at the original date. If you run into a broken link or an issue with an older post, don’t hesitate to drop us a line!

Now, we are manually adding all the older Spyhop Logs from the original website. Those that were written before the “B” was added to the “Log”! This is happening today!

Finally, we will create a forward so that those visiting a link to the old site, will be automatically redirected to this one.

615 dead dolphins on Peru beaches; acoustic tests for oil to blame? – World News

Written by Tursiops. Posted in Marine Mammal Stranding Network

615 dolphins have washed up on Peru beaches. More dolphins suspected dead. Surely we can do better. Are you ready for oil drilling off North Carolina? Is this the kind of thing that will help tourism and tourism related jobs? Something to think about.

615 dead dolphins found on Peru beaches; acoustic tests for oil to blame? – World News.

Stumpy the Right Whale is Being Installed in the NC Museum of Science

Written by Keith_Rittmaster. Posted in Bonehenge; Cetacean rearticulation, Cetacean Studies, Education, Uncategorized

Keith Rittmaster, the leader of Cape Lookout Studies Program,was in Raleigh, NC last week working with Dan DenDanto and his Whales and Nails team installing a reassembled  52 foot right right whale in the NC Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh. Good practice for the 34 foot sperm whale  that Keith  will soon install in the NC Maritime Museum in Beaufort, NC.
Un-posed above and posed below. Above, Keith is in the red t-shirt and below in the blue hard hat with the Whales and Nails team.
For more information. about the whale reassembly process in Maine.
And here for more on the installation work at the Museum of Science.
This will be an amazing educational display. Stumpy, and her calves, were right whales well known to researchers. She had migrated up and down the Atlantic Coast for years.She was found floating dead near the NC-VA border after being hit by a large ship. At the time of her death she was almost ready to deliver a male fetus. The fetus died. His skeleton will be displayed where she was carrying him at the time of their death. Her jaw was broken from the ship strike. Pieces of her jaw bone were used to research the damage from a ship strike at different ship speeds. This is valuable information that will help establish the speed that ships can safely travel in waters where these whales live and travel.

Field Guides & Turtle Watch

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