The boys are back in town

Written by Tursiops. Posted in bottlenose dolphin photo ID

            A strong and enduring relationship in wild bottlenose dolphin societies is that between adult males.  They pair up during adolescence in a relationship (often side-by-side) that persists for decades.  “Moe” and “Buddy” are such a pair, seen near Beaufort, NC primarily during winter months.  We first saw them this season in Back Sound by Middle Marsh on October 23, 2012.  Their sighting tables below highlight why we refer to them as “winter” dolphins in Beaufort.

The date on each of the 2 photos at the top of each table indicates when each picture was taken enabling you to see if/how the features we use to identify that dolphin change over time. The red lines associate each fin photo with the month the picture was taken. The table beneath the photos highlights when the featured dolphin was seen – a darkened cell indicates the month and year in which we have photographed that dolphin at least once in Beaufort.


Cetacean populations show regional differences.

Written by Tursiops. Posted in Cetacean Studies

Tursiops truncatus feeding technique

Florida bottlenose dolphins stir up mud “nets’ to corral fish (from BBC’s “Life”)

In the short time I’ve been volunteering for the Cape lookout Studies Program, I’ve learned a lot about how our local dolphins behave in ways that are not consistent throughout the world. While researchers are still learning the “whys” for these differences – it’s seems clear to me that cetaceans around the world have developed some interesting behavioral differences in different parts of the world. For example, some bottlenose dolphins chase fish up on shore, and others stir up mud to corral fish and then feed as their prey try to jump out of the nets.

Sri Lanka’s Unorthodox Whales

Which brings us to the blue whales in the Indian Ocean off the southern coast of Sri Lanka. They don’t follow the migration patterns observed in most blue whale populations.

Field Guides & Turtle Watch

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