First Look: World’s Rarest Whale

Written by Tursiops. Posted in Cetacean Studies

Spade-toothed beaked whaleSpade-Toothed Beaked Whale

There’s a new post over at OurAmazingPlanet.com with stranding images of the world’s rarest whale: the spade-toothed beaked whale.

The whales stranded themselves in 2010 but are so similar to Gray’s beaked whales, they’ve only been confirmed as spade-toothed beaked whales recently. The stranding occured in New Zealand.

UPDATE

Click here to read the actual article published in the journal Current Biology by Kirsten ThompsonC. Scott BakerAnton van HeldenSelina PatelCraig Millar and Rochelle Constantine.

A word about strandings

There are many reasons that whales strand themselves, not all are understood. It can be a heartbreaking moment to discover a marine mammal stranding. But we do learn a lot about whale species when this happens. If you discover a stranded marine mammal (dead or alive) contact your local marine mammal stranding network immediately.

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Tursiops

Tursiops truncatus is the scientific name for the common bottlenose dolphin. Tursiops is also the user name shared by volunteers who contribute to this blog. If you have an idea for a blog post, or think we should comment on an article you've found, click the contact button above and drop us a line!

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