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The boys are back in town

Written by Tursiops. Posted in bottlenose dolphin photo ID

            A strong and enduring relationship in wild bottlenose dolphin societies is that between adult males.  They pair up during adolescence in a relationship (often side-by-side) that persists for decades.  “Moe” and “Buddy” are such a pair, seen near Beaufort, NC primarily during winter months.  We first saw them this season in Back Sound by Middle Marsh on October 23, 2012.  Their sighting tables below highlight why we refer to them as “winter” dolphins in Beaufort.

The date on each of the 2 photos at the top of each table indicates when each picture was taken enabling you to see if/how the features we use to identify that dolphin change over time. The red lines associate each fin photo with the month the picture was taken. The table beneath the photos highlights when the featured dolphin was seen – a darkened cell indicates the month and year in which we have photographed that dolphin at least once in Beaufort.


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Tursiops

Tursiops truncatus is the scientific name for the common bottlenose dolphin. Tursiops is also the user name shared by volunteers who contribute to this blog. If you have an idea for a blog post, or think we should comment on an article you’ve found, click the contact button above and drop us a line!

Comments (1)

  • Jeremy T.

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    Wow, they seem like best buds. Do they take turns being each other’s wingman at the underwater pick-up bars? Great post, Tursiops!

    Reply

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