• They have a lot more to teach us.

    We've learned a lot with your help. But there's still so much we need to know to protect our wild dolphin neighbors.

    Give to dolphin research at the Cape Lookout Studies Program.

  • Sea Turtel sick and injured from fishing line

    You can stop this.

    Protecting marine wildlife is within your reach.

    When you give to put monofilament recycling bins within reach of conscientious boaters and anglers.

  • Harbor seal in need

    Save lives, reduce suffering, learn more.

    It's a win, win, win – when you support our Marine Mammal Stranding Network.

    Please give generously to the Cape Lookout Studies Program.

  • Cetacean Studies

    Inspire curiosity.

    What does it take to get students interested in science and conservation? Your help.

    Please give generously to support Cetacean Studies and the Bonehenge rearticulation project.

EVENT: We <3 Echo! Your chance to see a real whale heart.

Written by Tursiops. Posted in Uncategorized

Whales have big hearts.

No, really big hearts. Like, massive. And the actual heart that once belonged to Echo, the sperm whale skeleton hanging in the North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort, NC is being displayed at the museum for the very first time.

Is it squishy and gross?

No! It’s plastinated. They take the actual heart and replace the water and lipid tissues with curable polymers. Basically, the heart has been turned to plastic. As far as we know, it’s the first sperm whale heart to undergo the process.

“This is a one-of-a-kind specimen,” said Keith Rittmaster, the museum’s Natural Science Curator. “Dozens of talented and enthusiastic collaborators from various schools and laboratories conspired to preserve and study this sperm whale heart with the goal of returning it for display with Echo, at the North Carolina Maritime Museum at Beaufort.”

When and where can I see this cardiac curiosity?

North Carolina Maritime Museum, Beaufort, NC

Thursday, Feb. 14 from noon to 1 p.m. (That’s one huge Valentine. Bring your sweetheart, point at the whale heart and tell your date, “this is how much I love you!”)

Saturday, Feb. 16 from 7 to 9 p.m.. Saturday’s event will offer heart science lectures, a comparative heart anatomy seminar, heart-healthy munchies and additional displays.

Go Deeper:

Click here for more information on this event!

Click here to learn more about Echo, the 33′ sperm whale skeleton on display in the museum.

Click here to read about Echo’s stranding from January 2004.

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Tursiops

Tursiops truncatus is the scientific name for the common bottlenose dolphin. Tursiops is also the user name shared by volunteers who contribute to this blog. If you have an idea for a blog post, or think we should comment on an article you’ve found, click the contact button above and drop us a line!

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